Take surveys. You can earn $50 to $100 per month in cash and products by taking online surveys. Find survey sites by searching for “paid survey sites” online. Sign up for several survey sites to increase your chances of being selected for higher-paying surveys. Register with an email address, and check your email often so you can respond quickly to survey offers.


Etsy: While Etsy's popularity has declined recently, it's still a great resource for selling handmade items online. No need for complex ecommerce sites or merchant accounts or any sort of automation. The company takes a commission of every sale and charges a small listing fee per item. But many still use Etsy as their primary source of income. The best part is that you can also sell digital products on here such as poster designs. 
Ten years ago, freelancers had to do a lot of legwork to find freelance gigs. Today's freelancers have so many job possibilities at their fingertips, thanks to the Internet. With a simple click, you can start freelancing. It's easier than ever to get job descriptions in front of your eyes from companies and individuals looking for extra help for everything from administrative duties to graphic design.
I have 3 VAs. I couldn’t function without them. It doesn’t matter how big or how small a business is, they all need help running their day-to-day administrative tasks. Virtual assistants perform a variety of tasks that a traditional assistant or secretary would normally do, including making travel arrangements, paying bills, or managing expense reimbursements. I use them to upload content, optimize images, brief writers etc.
Quitting your job is always a scary thing. But it can be downright terrifying when you don’t have another one lined up. The nerves build up to the surface from the moment you hand in your resignation notice. “Where are you going?” is typically the first question your boss and coworkers will ask. Saying you’re not sure will undoubtedly lead to quizzical glances and perhaps even snickers of “you’re crazy.” But here are seven times when quitting with no backup plan is the right thing to do for your career.

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You don't fit in with the corporate culture and/or you don't believe in the company anymore. “You feel that there are ethical or moral differences in how the company and you believe the firm should operate; cultural differences; work ethic clashes, and so on,” Taylor says. Whatever the issue, you're morally misaligned with your employer, and it's an uncomfortable workplace setting.
If your boss offers you more money to stay, you might be tempted to take it. Think carefully before doing that, because there’s a reason you started job-searching in the first place, and those factors will remain once the high from the raise wears off. Plus, the fact that you needed to be walking out the door in order to get paid what you’re worth isn’t a great sign, and it’s possible that it’ll be harder to get raises in the future. In fact, the next time you’re seeking a raise, you might be told, “We just gave you that big increase when you were thinking of leaving.”
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