Test websites. Remote usability testing means getting paid to navigate a website for the first time and giving feedback to the website owner. Most tests take approximately 15 minutes, and you can get paid up to $10 for each test. A test involves performing a scenario on the client’s website and recording yourself doing it. For example, you might be asked to go through the process of selecting and purchasing an item on a retailer’s website.[1]
The corporate environment isn't for everyone. There, now it's out in the open. Based on a 2015 Small Business Profile report issued by the Small Business Administration, there were 22.7M small businesses without employees in the United States, so that's a lot of individuals who have chosen a non-traditional career path. I, for example, had a great job, and was appreciated and respected by my coworkers and manager. At the end of the day, though, I had that little voice, and I knew it was time for me to make the decision to leave the corporate environment, at least for the time being. Choosing to leave was the best decision I could have made for myself at the time, and it's OK for you to make that choice for when to quit your job, too, if you know it's the right one for you.
When you should use it: Your employer is not automatically entitled to an explanation about why you’re quitting or where you’re going next, says Karlyn Borysenko, principal at Zen Workplace, an organizational development consultancy based in Merrimack, New Hampshire. If you feel like your employer would cause problems for you or attempt to interfere at your next job, this is a recommended approach.
If you're not using internet marketing to market your business you should be. An online presence is crucial to helping potential clients and customer find your business - even if your business is small and local. (In 2017, one third of all mobile searches were local and local search was growing 50% faster than mobile searches overall.) Online is where the eyeballs are so that's where your business needs to be. 
A good boss, work-life balance, and consistency helps you stay put, says Caplan. “But if these components are not present, most people will jump ship,” she says. “If you see your respected colleagues leaving right and left, know the issues are most likely systemic. This is a signal that it is time to find a new ship that is sailing in the right direction.”
If your boss offers you more money to stay, you might be tempted to take it. Think carefully before doing that, because there’s a reason you started job-searching in the first place, and those factors will remain once the high from the raise wears off. Plus, the fact that you needed to be walking out the door in order to get paid what you’re worth isn’t a great sign, and it’s possible that it’ll be harder to get raises in the future. In fact, the next time you’re seeking a raise, you might be told, “We just gave you that big increase when you were thinking of leaving.”
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