“If you are not mentally engaged in what you are doing for a living, don’t wait too long to make a change,” says Holly Caplan, career coach and author of Surviving the Dick Clique: A Girl’s Guide to Surviving the Male Dominated Corporate World. “Staying in a role you find completely uninspiring will do a number on your self worth and will be detected by your manager. When you feel this stagnancy or boredom linger, it is a sign that it is time to go.”
I liken this to a paradoxical Catch-22 scenario, because it seems like without one you can't have the other. It takes money to drive traffic, but it takes traffic to make money. So don't make the mistake that millions of other online marketers make around the world. Before you attempt to scale or send any semblance of traffic to your offers, be sure to split-test things to oblivion and determine your conversion rates before diving in headfirst.
If you've built a client base, or designed or developed technology pivotal to your company, make sure it’s legal to take copies of what you brought to the table. “Read your employment agreement carefully and understand the obligations it imposes on your as an employee — or former employee,” advises Schlesinger. “These legal obligations are not to be taken lightly.”

According to Welch, spending considerable time thinking about life somewhere other than your current company is proof that you're no longer engaged with your work. "If you're thinking about quitting all the time," says Welch, "you already know what you need to know. It's time for you to go find a better fit, face exciting challenges and grow in new ways."

When you’re unhappy in your current position, it can be very tempting to put in two-weeks’ notice before you have a new job. Of course, conventional wisdom says that it’s much better to wait to quit a job until after you’ve safely secured another one. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. To determine if you can afford—literally—to quit your job before finding a new one, here are some questions you should ask yourself:


It can be interesting to go against the grain, I know. It can also be tough to admit you're not happy when you have a good paying job (or a job at all depending on the current economy), food on the table, and a roof over your head. Heck, you might even like your co-workers. But something still might not feel right to you. It might take you some time, but eventually, you know you need to listen to that little voice that's telling you that you need to make some changes in your life, and it might need to start with your job and career choice. If that means quitting your job, current position, or current workgroup, it's OK for you to make the plans to do so. It's OK for you to make choices that will bring fulfillment to your work and life, and the fact is, you're the only one that can choose do it for yourself.    

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